WinStars 3 is now compatible with the Raspberry Pi computers

The Raspberry Pi is a  small single-board computers developed in the United Kingdom by the Raspberry Pi Foundation in association with Broadcom.

The Raspberry Pi was created to democratise access to computers. Available for less than 40€ in its basic version, it offers several variants of the free GNU/Linux operating system but also works with proprietary OS (Windows 10 IoT Core or Google Android Pi).

The Raspberry 4b board

Ode to Commodore

For a few weeks now, the Raspberry Pi foundation has been offering a version with a keyboard that looks furiously familiar to us.  Taking leaves from the Commodore and ZX Spectrum playbooks, the Pi 400 is a redesigned Raspberry Pi 4 fitted inside a compact keyboard. It is resistant and has a passive cooling system. This can make it an interesting ally during your astronomical observations.

The Raspberry 400

WinStars 3 is now available for free on these little computers. The installation is a little bit complicated but you just need to methodically apply these instructions in a terminal.

The program runs at 20 frames per second on the Raspberry 400 and it is possible to improve performance by overclocking the computer. My Raspberry 400, which runs at 2000Mhz, never goes above 40º.

It is an inexpensive solution to drive a telescope (the Raspberry version offers compatibility with the Indi module) with all the features of the program at hand and, in particular, the gigantic Gaia EDR3 star catalogue which is particularly useful for tracking and making asteroid light curves for example.